The 7.3 turbo was the first successful Porsche 911 Turbo, and it had a profound impact on the automotive industry. The 7.3 Turbo was introduced in 1974 as a successor to the 930 model, which used 3 liters of displacement for its naturally aspirated engine. The 7.3 Turbo used an air-cooled 2 liter engine with two cylinders that were forced into action by a turbocharger when needed, boosting power output up to 300 hp at 5500 rpm and increasing torque from 260 lbft at 2500 rpm to 310 ftlb at 3000 rpm – all while maintaining its class leading 0-60 time of 5 seconds flat!

7.0Turbo Carrera RS Clubsport – 700 hp, 400 lbft at 5000 rpm, 0 to 60 mph in just over four seconds!

Motto: “We go flat out!” or “Porsche goes full throttle”

Annual production size: Around 3000 units annually from 1974 until today with a few exceptions during the last quarter of 2008 and 2009 due to changes in emissions standards for cars released after 2006 that Porsche had not yet addressed on its vehicles such as the Cayenne SUV which resulted in lost sales totaling around €200 million (US$260 million)

Annual production costs: Estimated around €420,000 (US$530,000) per unit in 2006

Estimated total sales revenue from the 7.0 Turbo and its variants over a lifetime of 30 years since 1974 to 2004 when it was discontinued: Around US $220 billion or EUR 150 billion at then-current exchange rates

Number of units sold globally: Over 60,000 between 1974 until 2004 with more than half being Cayenne SUV’s – which were only introduced into Porsche’s model lineup in 2002 as an attempt by parent company Volkswagen AG to broaden their appeal beyond ultra-expensive sports cars and sedans

Porsche Mission Statement: “We are driven by our passion for engineering.”

The Porsche 7.0 Turbo is a car that revolutionized the automotive industry with its turbocharged engine and excellent handling at high speeds. The 7.0 was introduced in 1974, taking over from the more powerful 911 as Porsche’s flagship model to compete against rival German automakers like Mercedes Benz who were dominating on racing circuits with their own turbo engines.

The first 7.0 Turbos cost around €200 million (US$260 million) each and had annual production costs of approximately €420,000 per unit for 30 years since it was introduced until 2004 when it was discontinued due to changing emissions standards – amounting to total sales revenue from just this one vehicle reaching US $220 billion or EUR 150 billion at then-current exchange rates .

In its lifespan, the 7.0 Turbo had a total of just under 13 thousand units produced with only around 600 to 700 being sold in North America through 2004 when it was discontinued over emissions standards changes and high production costs.

The Porsche 7.0 Turbo S is an expensive car for those who can afford one costing more than €200 million (US$260 million) new and available only by special order from Porsche dealerships that have access to the vehicle – or second-hand on sites like eBay where used examples cost between US $160K-$240k depending on mileage/condition.

This post goes away from our usual content but we wanted to highlight how influential this particular model has been in automotive history

The 7.0 Turbo was the first Porsche to offer turbocharging, and still one of the most well-known Porsches in existence today. This car combined a traditional body style with new technology, something that would set the tone for future Porsche products. Previous models were seen as impractical because they cost too much and broke down often; this model changed all of that. The 7.0 Turbo offered buyers an affordable option with little upkeep required and became popular worldwide almost immediately after its release on May 12th 1964 at Frankfurt Motor Show.

Conclusion:

The 7.3 Turbo was the first successful Porsche 911 Turbo, and it had a profound impact on the automotive industry. The 7.3 Turbo was introduced in 1974 as a successor to the 930 model, which used 3 liters of displacement for its naturally aspirated engine. The 7.3 Turbo used an air-cooled 2 liter engine with two cylinders that were forced into action by a turbocharger when needed, boosting power output up to 300 hp at 5500 rpm and increasing torque from 260 lbft at 2500 rpm to 310 ftlb at 3000 rpm – all while maintaining its class leading 0-60 time of 5 seconds flat!

Author

Carmel Issac is a freelance writer who offers to ghostwrite, copywriting, and blogging services. She works closely with B2C and B2B businesses providing digital marketing content that gains social media attention and increases their search engine visibility

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